Bill of Rights

$0.00

The lesson summarizes and analyzes the Bill of Rights, specifically addressing each of the first ten amendments from the United States Constitution.  Examples of their use in America, and some of the controversy surrounding the amendments are also discussed.  Prior to the lesson, the students should have a basic understanding of the U.S. Constitution, and this lesson may be used in conjunction with a lesson related to the Constitution.  In addition, many students will have a strong opinion on one or more of the amendments which can lend itself to a classroom debate.

Bill of Rights Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about Bill of Rights
  • Hands-on homework activities
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 4-6 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

*Note: These lessons are PDF downloads. You will be directed to the download once you checkout. Clarendon Learning resources are FREE, we rely 100% on donations to operate our site. Thank you for your support!

Description

The lesson summarizes and analyzes the Bill of Rights, specifically addressing each of the first ten amendments from the United States Constitution.  Other important historical documents that influenced the Bill of Rights are mentioned in the lesson, such as the Magna Carta.  Each amendment in the Bill of Rights is described and examples are given relating to its use.  Prior to the lesson, the students should have a basic understanding of the U.S. Constitution.  In addition, many students will have a strong opinion on one or more of the amendments which can lend itself to a classroom debate.  The lesson may be used in conjunction with a lesson related to the Constitution.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction: 

  1. Ask: What are some of the rights you have in America?
  2. Allow for responses and discussion. What gives people in America their rights?  Why do we have these rights?
  3. Allow for responses and discussion. Introduce the Bill of Rights.
  4. Distribute Bill of Rights content pages. Read and review the information with the students.  During a review of each amendment, ask students to share examples of when it could be violated or when it is followed in everyday life.  Save the final question for the lesson closing.  Use the additional resources to enhance understanding.
  5. Distribute Activity page. Read and review the instructions.  Pair students.  Encourage students spend several minutes on each amendment part.  The activity may be completed as a class discussion or debate.  Circulate through the room to ensure students remain on task.
  6. Once completed, student pairs share their responses. Class members may agree or disagree with the implications, but must logically support opinions.  At the end of the activity discussion, ask students what might have happened if the Bill of Rights never existed.
  7. Distribute Practice page. Check and review the students’ responses.
  8. Distribute the Homework page. The next day, check and review the students’ responses.
  9. In closing, ask students: What are the rights you do not have, or have limits, because you are not yet an adult?
  10. Allow for responses and discussion.

Common Core State Standards:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.3, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.5, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.3, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.7, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.3, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.3, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.7, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.6.2, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6.4, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6.10

Class Sessions (45 minutes): At least 2 class sessions

Additional Resources: 

Many more teaching resources in Download!

Want more social studies resources? Check out our other Social Studies Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade

Subject

Social Studies