Comparing Written vs Video

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Develop analytical and critical thinking skills in your student with our Comparing Written vs Video Lesson Plan.  Guided instruction demonstrates how to analyze books to their film adaptations to compare and contrast them.  Students are prepared to explore key elements, including setting, characters, and plot events of both the first chapter of a book and the first part of the corresponding film.

Comparing Written vs Video Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about Comparing Written vs Video.
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on analyzing books to their film adaptations, etc.
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 4-6 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

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Description

Develop analytical and critical thinking skills in your student with our Comparing Written vs Video Lesson Plan.  Guided instruction demonstrates how to analyze books to their film adaptations to compare and contrast them.  Students are prepared to explore key elements, including setting, characters, and plot events of both the first chapter of a book and the first part of the corresponding film.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

  1. Call students to the carpet/front of the room to sit together. Ask students if they have ever seen a film based on a book. Mention some recent popular examples such as the Harry Potter series, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, or others. Ask students to raise their hands if they have ever seen a film based on a book, and read the book the film was based on. Ask students if they noticed any differences between the two.
  2. Say, “Typically there are differences between the film and the book it is based on. That can happen for many reasons, time constraints, the difficulty of capturing emotions that are written and scenes that are described in words when you have to use pictures and actors. The main things to consider when comparing film to text is how well the film conveyed the author’s message. We are going to be examining books and portions of movies to compare them. As we do this, we will be focusing on how well the film captured certain key items that are crucial to the book.”
  3. Ask students what they think would be the most important items to keep true to the book when creating a movie based on it. Create the key viewing/reading topics anchor chart. Feel free to add other questions that the students contributed as well.
  4. As a whole class, lead a comparison of the first chapter of A Bear Called Paddington by Michael Bond which can be found here: https://www.action.org.uk/sites/default/files/ downloads/bring_your_bear/school/byb_paddington_ extract.pdf
  5. After reading aloud to the students, have them volunteer to supply answers about the key elements of the first chapter, including setting, characters, and plot events. Write the answers on the board on one side of a t-chart. Then use the link https://123movies.is/film/paddington-2220/watching.html to watch the Paddington movie for free, or you can rent a copy or find on another streaming service. Watch until Paddington arrives at the Brown’s house, and then stop the movie.
  6. Have students volunteer to supply answers about the key elements of the first part of the film, including setting, characters, and plot events. Lead a discussion on which items are similar and different.
  7. Have students complete Activity Sheet 1, which is a close reading analysis of the text they heard vs. the movie they saw based on the text.

(continuing…)

Common Core State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.7, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.6.2, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.6.3, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.3, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.6.7

Class Sessions (45 minutes): 4

Additional Resources:

Want more reading resources?  Check out our other Reading Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade

Subject

Reading