Concept Mapping

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In our concept Mapping Lesson Plan, students will identify a purpose for concept mapping in reading both literature and nonfiction texts. Students will use concept mapping to explore the relationship between characters in literature and to organize information in nonfiction text. Analytical skills are developed as students look for similarities and solidify their understanding of how using a concept map helps them to better understand the relationship.

Concept Mapping Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about Concept Mapping.
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on determining how to use concept mapping to explore the relationship between characters, etc.
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 4-6 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

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Description

In our concept Mapping Lesson Plan, students will identify a purpose for concept mapping in reading both literature and nonfiction texts. Students will use concept mapping to explore the relationship between characters in literature and to organize information in nonfiction text. Analytical skills are developed as students look for similarities and solidify their understanding of how using a concept map helps them to better understand the relationship.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

  1. Call students to the carpet/front of the room to sit together in front of the board or easel with chart paper. Ask students if they have ever heard of the story The Three Little Pigs. Many students will have, but if some have not, here is the quick read of the story (choose short version at https://www.silvereye.com.au/documents/ sample_pages/prod579.pdf It is fine if students have heard variations that are different from this. Feel free to use another fairytale or picture book if you prefer. After reading or ascertaining that all students are familiar with the text, ask them to silently think of the answer to this question. “What is the life lesson in The Three Little Pigs?”
  2. Draw a circle in the center of the board and write “What is the life lesson in The Three Little Pigs?” inside the center. Call for student volunteers to help supply answers.
  3. Say “There are many kinds of graphic organizers. They allow us to easily view and organize information. When we are learning and exploring a specific concept, we create a special graphic organizer to explore information or relationships, and this is called a “Concept Map.”
  4. On chart paper, draw a model of a basic web style concept map so that students can see the structure. The key concept should be in the middle, which multiple lines stemming from it. Each of those lines should include a word associated with concept mapping idea, and further specific words should stem from those second-tier words. For a visual of the format, try this website or refer to the example in warm-up: https://www. pinterest.com/pin/9218374216186183/ For specific words for your anchor chart and how they should be placed in bubbles, see below:
  5. Say, “We will use concept maps for both nonfiction and literary texts. Let’s use the sample literary passage to create a concept map.
    Central bubble: Concept mapping
    Second row of bubbles: Show relationships between elements in a concept (third row- character to character relationships, main ideas, themes, explore conflicts, life lessons)
    Second row of bubbles: Organize factual information, Answer nonfiction questions (third row- explain key facts, ask questions to narrow focus, list details, and sources
  6. Read the literary sample passage aloud. Have students work in pairs to complete Activity Page One, which is a concept map that explores the relationship between the main characters and answer the questions. As a whole group, recreate the concept map on the board and explore the different answers, looking for similarities. Ask how the concept map helped students better understand the relationship.

(continuing…)

Common Core Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.10, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.7

Additional Resources:

Want more reading resources?  Check out our other Reading Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade

Subject

Reading