Editing and Proofreading

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Many beginning writers may not have been introduced to proofreading and editing.  The lesson explains the difference between the two concepts, as well as shows students steps to proofreading and editing their own written work.  It is important for students to have ample opportunities to write and proofread/edit their written work to become better writers.  Many students text on cell phones and do not reread or edit before sending a message.  It is also helpful to pair students as they can help each other and practice editing and proofing strategies.

Editing and Proofreading Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about Editing and Proofreading
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on Editing and Proofreading
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 1-3 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

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Description

The lesson explains the difference between proofreading and editing, and teaches students how to effectively use both skills.  Proofreading is a challenging habit to learn, especially since students “write” everyday when they send text messages, and those are certainly not proofread or edited.  Students also underestimate the importance of proofreading, and run out of time to complete it effectively as they finish their writing for an assignment.  It is important for students to have ample opportunities to write and proofread/edit their written work to become better writers.  It is also helpful to pair students as they can help each other and practice editing and proofing strategies.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

  1. Display a few simple unrelated sentences with several types of errors. Ask students to read aloud the sentences.  Ask:  What do the sentences have in common?  (All of them have an error.)
  2. Allow for responses and discussion. Ask students what errors each sentence contains.  Ask students what can be done to correct each sentence.
  3. Allow for responses and discussion. Rewrite each sentence correctly following the proofing and editing.  Ask students what it is called when they must reread their written work.
  4. Allow for responses and discussion. Introduce Editing and Proofreading.
  5. Distribute Editing and Proofreading content pages. Read and review the information with the students.  Save the final question for the lesson closing.  Use the additional resources to enhance understanding.
  6. Distribute Activity page. Read and review the instructions.  Pair students.  Circulate through the room to ensure students remain on task, and to assist where necessary.
  7. Once completed, the students will read aloud the final copy of their stories, with each partner taking turns reading parts of it to the class.
  8. Distribute Practice page. Check and review the students’ responses. Depending on the grade-level, the page may be done aloud as a class.
  9. Distribute the Homework page. Encourage students to work with a parent or another adult family member to complete the homework.  (The page may also be completed aloud during class time.)
  10. In closing, ask students: What do you think it would be like if authors and writers, like you, did not edit or proofread written work? What problems might it cause?  Why?

Common Core State Standards: 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.1.5, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.5, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.5

Class Sessions (45 minutes): At least 2 class sessions

Additional Resources: 

Want more language arts resources? Check out our other Language Arts Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade

Subject

Language Arts