Evaluating Opinions and Arguments

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Develop critical thinking skills with our Evaluating Opinions and Arguments Lesson Plan, which prepares students to effectively evaluate opinions and arguments, as well as to differentiate an opinion and argument based on facts and supporting evidence.  Equip your students with the ability to sift through the opinions and arguments they are bombarded with on social media, news organizations, and other media throughout the day. Once they can identify the differences, students can then better judge the quality of an argument or opinion. This lesson also enhances written expression skills as students develop their ability to write effective arguments.

Evaluating Opinions and Arguments Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about evaluating opinions and arguments
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on distinguishing opinions and arguments, as well as crafting an effective argument
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 4-6 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

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Description

Develop critical thinking skills with our Evaluating Opinions and Arguments Lesson Plan, which prepares students to effectively evaluate opinions and arguments, as well as to differentiate an opinion and argument based on facts and supporting evidence.  Equip your students with the ability to sift through the opinions and arguments they are bombarded with on social media, news organizations, and other media throughout the day. Once they can identify the differences, students can then better judge the quality of an argument or opinion. This lesson also enhances written expression skills as students develop their ability to write effective arguments.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

1. Ask: Who is the greatest super hero from a movie or book? Why?
2. Allow for responses and discussion. Following several answers, encourage students to back up their choices with reasons telling why they think the super hero is the greatest. Allow students who chose the same super hero to come together to further discuss and support their opinions.
3. Continue with more responses and discussion. Ask: What is the difference between a good argument and a bad argument?
4. Allow for responses and discussion. Introduce Evaluating Opinions and Arguments.
5. Distribute Evaluating Opinions and Arguments content pages. Read and review the information with the students. Save the final question/statement for the lesson closing. Use the additional resources to enhance understanding.
6. Distribute Activity page. Read and review the instructions. Create groups of three. Encourage the students to “argue”
with others appropriately, and take notes during the argument.
(Teacher may help with topics if necessary.) Allow students sufficient time to create topics and for arguments to be presented.
7. Give students access to the Internet if necessary for additional fact searching.
8. Once Internet searches are complete, students should work alone to complete their individual paragraphs.
9. Students may then share aloud with the class one or more of their completed argument paragraphs. Allow other students to evaluate the arguments.
10. Distribute Practice page. Check and review the students’ responses

Common Core State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.8, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.8, CCSS.ELA- LITERACY.RI.6.8

Class Sessions (45 minutes): At least 2 class sessions.

Additional Resources:

Want more reading resources?  Check out our other Reading Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade

Subject

Reading