Figures of Speech

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The lesson introduces students to many different types of figures of speech.  Most students have heard the phrase “it is a figure of speech”, however, many students may not know what the term means.  Even though they use figures of speech themselves, the students may not be able to identify the different types.  It is important for students to become aware of the wide variety of figurative language used in novels, stories, and other content.  There are other related lessons which will give students more details, examples, and other information about each of the most commonly used figures of speech.

Figures of Speech Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about Figures of Speech
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on identifying and using Figures of Speech
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 5-6 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

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Description

The lesson introduces students to the phrase “figures of speech” and helps them understand the difference between phrases that are literal and nonliteral.  Even though students use figures of speech themselves, they may not be able to identify or differentiate the various types.  It is important for students to become aware of the wide variety of figurative language used in novels, stories, and other content to improve their reading skills and make them a better speaker.  There are other related lessons which will give students more details, examples, and other information about each of the most commonly used figures of speech.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

  1. Display the following statements and ask: What do the statements have in common?  What is different about them?  (I ate a ton of food, I’ll never fall asleep, the tree shook with fear, civil war)
  2. Allow for responses and discussion. Ask students if they are familiar with the statements, and if they have heard them before.
  3. Allow for responses and discussion. Ask students if they know what they are called in the English language.  (Figures of Speech)
  4. Allow for responses and discussion. Lead students to Figures of Speech while introducing the term.
  5. Distribute Figures of Speech content pages. Read and review the information with the students.  Save the final question for the lesson closing.  Use the additional resources to enhance understanding.
  6. Distribute Activity page. Read and review the instructions.  Pair students.  Encourage students to be as creative and original as possible.  Distribute dictionaries.  Allow sufficient time for completion.
  7. Once students have completed the activity, students will share one or more of the examples with the class. Collect the completed work to check for student understanding of each figure of speech.  (Responses will vary.)
  8. Distribute Practice page. Check and review the students’ responses.
  9. Distribute the Homework page. The next day, check and review the students’ responses.  Allow students to read aloud their short stories, and other students identify the figure of speech types.
  10. In closing, ask: What is your favorite figure of speech or the figure of speech you use most often? Why?

Common Core State Standards: 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5.A              CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.5

Class Sessions (45 minutes): At least 2 class sessions

Additional Resources: 

Want more language arts resources? Check out our other Language Arts Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

5th Grade, 6th Grade

Subject

Language Arts