Integrating Information

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Equip your students with a foundational life skill with our interactive Integrating Information Lesson Plan, which prepares them to connect with content on a deeper and broader level.  By developing the mental stamina and flexibility to compare and contrast facts and information to determine reliable sources and build schema, students are empowered to digest the information they are bombarded with on a daily basis.  This lesson presents strategies for skillful integration of information that allows students to combine fragments and details to complete a whole picture, which includes more information and knowledge.

Integrating Information Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about integrating information
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on comparing and contrasting facts, and integrating information
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 4-6 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

*Note: These lessons are PDF downloads. You will be directed to the download once you checkout. Clarendon Learning resources are FREE, we rely 100% on donations to operate our site. Thank you for your support!

Description

Equip your students with a foundational life skill with our interactive Integrating Information Lesson Plan, which prepares them to connect with content on a deeper and broader level.  By developing the mental stamina and flexibility to compare and contrast facts and information to determine reliable sources and build schema, students are empowered to digest the information they are bombarded with on a daily basis.  This lesson presents strategies for skillful integration of information that allows students to combine fragments and details to complete a whole picture, which includes more information and knowledge.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

1. Call students to the carpet/front of the room to sit together. Explain that today they are going to look at
two pieces of information about the same subject. When they are done, they are going to complete one list of
facts, using information from both sources. The topic will be thunderstorms. They will first watch this short
video clip http://study.com/academy/lesson/what-arethunderstorms-definition-types-formation.html (stop at
the 2:55 minute marker) and then read the example passage called “The Thunder and Lightning Partnership”. The video clip explains the formation of thunderstorms. The example passage focuses only on how thunder and lightning go together.
2. After watching and reading, address the class and say, “Both pieces were about thunderstorms, right? Did both pieces have the same information, or just the same topic?” Clarify that though some information overlaps, it is the topic that is shared. New information is found in each source. As a whole class, create a fact list on chart paper or the board. Mark facts from the passage with a T for text, and facts with the video with a V for video.
3. After creating a list of shared facts, create a single statement that integrates information. Introduce the term “integrate” when you ask the students to create the single statement with your guidance. Say, “Can anyone define ‘integrate’?” Define or clarify that integration is when you bring items together to create a whole. Explain, “You may have heard of segregation, which is to separate by race or gender, or differentiate, which means to set things apart by differences. Integration is the opposite! It is all about bringing things together. In this lesson, we will focus on integrating information that we learn from different sources to help us create a deeper understanding.”
4. Create an anchor chart with students that will guide them through integrating information. Integrating Information
Determine the information that your sources share. Is it topic, character, genre, theme, main idea, or something else?
Read, view or listen to each source carefully! Organize the information in a chart or as notes where you compare and contrast the information that relates to the shared topic, theme, etc. Create a single statement or summary which explains what you learned, using information from both sources.
5. Assign partners to read and view the two sources about famous women in the American Revolution for Activity Page One. Have them complete the page working together. After all pairs are finished, create one large compare/contrast chart on the board, and have volunteers read out their summary statements.
6. Set a purpose for integrating information. Ask the students, “Why is it a good idea to be able to integrate information? When are some times in school and in daily life that you will need to be able to integrate information?” Brainstorm a list with students to help them see that this a valuable skill to possess. Examples might be reading/watching about something in the news, studying for a test, researching a topic for science, writing a history paper, taking a state exam that asks you to answer questions based on multiple passages, trying to decide if something is true and researching various sources to get the best answer.

7. Students will complete the practice page independently and check with a partner when finished to compare
summary statements. Once a peer checks the practice page, the teacher should do a final check.
8. Assign the homework assignment, which will allow students to choose a nonfiction topic to research using two or
more sources. One source should be in print. There are informational texts available at http://www.kidsdiscover.com/quick-reads/, https://www.sciencenewsforstudents.org/, http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/ and www.readworks.org (you need a free membership, but can search for pieces for your students once they tell you the topic). Make sure that you have students print or copy the link to their text source before heading home to complete the assignment. Library books or books from other sources may also be used.
9. Divide the class into small discussion groups to share summaries created for homework.
10. Have students complete the quiz.

Common Core State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.2, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.9

Class Sessions (45 minutes): 3-4

Additional Resources:

Want more reading resources?  Check out our other Reading Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade

Subject

Reading