Judicial Branch

$0.00

Many people, including students, are unfamiliar with the workings of the judicial branch of the government. Knowledge of the branch is usually related to decisions of the Supreme Court, or if one encounters the local or state court system, they learn of its role in society. For older students, holding mock hearings, allowing students to be judges, and other role-playing activities is strongly recommended.

Judicial Branch Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about Judicial Branch
  • Hands-on homework activities
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 4-6 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

*Note: These lessons are PDF downloads. You will be directed to the download once you checkout. Clarendon Learning resources are FREE, we rely 100% on donations to operate our site. Thank you for your support!

Description

This interesting lesson introduces students to the Judicial Branch of the United States government. The lesson could follow a general lesson about the three branches of government. Many people, including students, are unfamiliar with the workings of the judicial branch of the government. Knowledge of the branch is usually related to decisions of the Supreme Court, or if one encounters the local or state court system, they learn of its role in society. For older students, holding mock hearings, allowing students to be judges, and other role-playing activities is strongly recommended.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

  1. Read this scenario aloud: Anne’s house was damaged by a fallen tree. The tree seemed to be on her property, but it was discovered that 30 years earlier the tree had been planted by a neighbor. Anne went to court claiming the neighbor should be responsible for the damage. If you were a judge, how would you decide who pays for the damage? Anne or her neighbor?
  2. Allow for responses and discussion. Encourage students to give reasons for the decision. Ask students if more information would help make their decision.
  3. Allow for further responses and discussion. Ask students if they know who makes these types of decisions in society.
  4. Allow for responses. Introduce the Judicial Branch.
  5. Distribute Judicial Branch content pages. Read and review the information with the students. Save the final question for the lesson closing. Use the additional resources to enhance understanding.
  6. Distribute Activity page. Read and review the instructions. Place students in odd numbered groups of 3, 5 or 7. Assign a secretary for each group. Give students access to the Internet if necessary and sufficient time to review at least 3 of the listed cases.
  7. Once completed, each group shares their decisions and responses to the class.
  8. If time permits, as a class debate each law.
  9. Distribute Practice page. Check and review the students’ responses.
  10. Distribute the Homework page. The next day, check and review the students’ responses.

Common Core State Standards: 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.5
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.7
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.7
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.6.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6.10

Class Sessions (45 minutes): At least 2 class sessions

Additional Resources:

Want more social studies resources? Check out our other Social Studies Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade

Subject

Social Studies