Making Inferences

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Introduce students to the steps of creating inference when reading with our Making Inferences Lesson Plan.  Practical demonstration of how combining information received with information known allows us to figure out something not explicitly stated make the concept of inference more concrete for young students.  In this interactive lesson, students will make inferences based on text and further develop their critical thinking and reading comprehension skills.

Making Inferences Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about Inferences.
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on creating inference while reading, etc.
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 1-3 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

*Note: These lessons are PDF downloads. You will be directed to the download once you checkout. Clarendon Learning resources are FREE, we rely 100% on donations to operate our site. Thank you for your support!

Description

Introduce students to the steps of creating inference when reading with our Making Inferences Lesson Plan.  Practical demonstration of how combining information received with information known allows us to figure out something not explicitly stated make the concept of inference more concrete for young students.  In this interactive lesson, students will make inferences based on text and further develop their critical thinking and reading comprehension skills.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

  1. Sit in the front of the room/carpet area with a large book in your hands, but make sure students can’t see the cover. Call your students together to join you. Once they are seated, tell them to wait just a minute you want to finish reading a story before you start today’s lesson. While they sit, pretend to read a page in the book you’re holding. Act like this book is very funny and start smiling. Then pretend you are trying not to giggle, and then begin all-out laughing. Your students will probably ask what is going on, but just ignore them and keep pointing back to the book. (You could act like it makes you sad or angry, or any other obvious and easily recognized emotion.)
  2. Close the book and tell your students you are ready to start today’s lesson. Ask the students if they can tell what kind of book you were reading. Call for volunteers. Students should say “funny” or “silly”. Ask the students how they could tell and again call on volunteers. As students respond with items like “you were laughing”, “we saw you smiling and giggling” etc, confirm they are correct, but ask how they knew the book was funny. Help students tie together that the book caused the reactions of someone who is experiencing something funny.
  3. Ask the students, “Did I tell you the book was funny? Could you see the cover or title to know it was funny?” As the students confirm you did not, explain that they have just made an inference, a very important skill for readers to have.
  4. Explain the steps for inferring, by using the example that they just witnessed. The students received information, in this case, they saw how the teacher was acting. Then the students used what they already recognize as a sign that someone is reading something funny, such as laughing, smiling, and giggling while reading. Lastly, students combined the information received with the information they know and figured out something important that was not explicitly stated. That’s inference.

(continuing…)

Common Core State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.1

Class Sessions (45 minutes): 2-3

Additional Resources:

Want more reading resources?  Check out our other Reading Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade

Subject

Reading

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CG
11/09/2018
Carol G.
US

Great resource!

The lesson was ideal for 2nd graders.

VD
09/01/2017
vidya d.
US

Very interesting and fun

My kid really likes it