Personal Point of View

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Elevate reading comprehension and critical thinking skills with our Personal Point of View Lesson Plan, which prepares students to use character actions, dialogue, inferences, and motivation to find out about the character’s perception. Explore personal point of view as a gateway into understanding author’s message and bias, as well as to encourage students to explore their own opinions and reactions to literature.  This lesson stimulates reader engagement as students are equipped to create deeper connections to the text that they read.

Personal Point of View Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about Personal Point of View
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on identifying personal point of view, author intent, author bias and their own reaction to text
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 4-5 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

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Description

Elevate reading comprehension and critical thinking skills with our Personal Point of View Lesson Plan, which prepares students to use character actions, dialogue, inferences, and motivation to find out about the character’s perception. Explore personal point of view as a gateway into understanding author’s message and bias, as well as to encourage students to explore their own opinions and reactions to literature.  This lesson stimulates reader engagement as students are equipped to create deeper connections to the text that they read.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

1. Display two pictures of a city, one taken from ground level, one taken from above. Here are two examples you might like to use: https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/09/e5/31/cb/the-high-line.jpg and http://media.gettyimages.com/photos/lowlevel-aerialphotograph-of-the-financial-district-in-new-york-citypicture-id527817216. Ask students what the images show. They should reply buildings or a city. Ask if it is the same city/buildings, or different. Students may have differences of opinion. Explain, “This is the same city, but the pictures are very different. Why are they different?” Students may respond that one is from up close, one is from far, or one is at ground level, one is taken from above.
2. Discuss that the pictures show the same thing but from two different points of view. Define point of view as “the way a person feels about or looks at events”. Say, “The picture of the city street is the point of view of someone who lives or works there. The picture of the city from above is that of someone who is flying over the city in an airplane. The person who lives in or works in the city, on the ground level, will have a very different idea and relationship to the city than a
person who is just traveling there, visiting or flying over it. In stories, characters have different points of view, even though they may both be experiencing the same events. Sometimes you will have a different point of view than the characters.”
3. Read the sample passage called “Mouse Climbs a Mountain”. Discuss Mouse’s point of view vs. Alfie’s
point of view. As a group, complete activity page one after reading. Distribute copies of the example passage so that students can actively read and reread.
4. Discuss the answers that were collectively achieved. Guide the student discussion to focus on the fact that though Alfie and Mouse shared the same setting, the perspectives were very different. Mouse viewed the kitchen counter as a mountain, getting food was dangerous, humans were killers. Alfie viewed the kitchen as just another place in his home, Mouse as a startling pest, and then a harmless animal that he wanted to protect. If Alfie’s parents had been there, Mouse would have been the enemy, something to exterminate. Ask, “what would YOUR point of view be if you were the human in this story?”

5. Create an anchor chart to define personal point of view and look for ways to discover it while reading. What is Personal Point of View?
Point of View: Point of view is the angle of considering a situation, which shows us the opinion, or feelings of the individuals involved. When reading, point of view is the way the author lets readers experience what is happening in the text. Personal point of view, unique opinions, and feelings about a situation, can be different from character to character.
Readers can have their own personal point of view about what they read. They may agree or disagree with character’s actions and author’s intentions.
How can I find a character’s personal point of view when reading a story?
● Look at the character’s actions.
● Read the character’s dialogue and internal monologue (their thoughts) carefully.
● Think about the events and situations going on around the character and look for evidence and infer how those situations affect that person.
How can I compare my personal point of view to the author or characters in the story?
Ask yourself:
● If I were the character in this situation, what would I do differently?
● If I were the author, what would I change about the story or how the characters are behaving?
6. After reviewing the anchor chart, have students complete the practice page with a partner. As students
are completing the worksheet, monitor partner groups and assist as needed. Remind them that they can
use the anchor chart. Go over the answers as a whole class when completed.
7. Choose a text to read aloud, or use your current read aloud novel or picture book. Have students describe the
personal point of view as the main character in the story on the class portion of the Homework assignment
(see Homework page). Students will complete the homework assignment at home that evening to write
about their own personal point of view and how it compares and contrasts to the main character’s. If
you need additional books for this activity, this link has a large online library that you can access free for 30 days. https://freekidsbooks.org/ This link has unlimited free texts for children.
8. Have students share their responses to the homework in small groups. Also in small groups, play the short
game “From My Perspective…” which has children give a personal point of view in regards to famous
children’s literature events.
9. Have students complete the quiz.

Common Core State Standards:  RL.3.6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. RL.5.6.Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described. RL.4.6. Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third person narrations.

Class Sessions (45 minutes): 3

Additional Resources:

Want more reading resources?  Check out our other Reading Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

3rd Grade, 4th Grade

Subject

Reading