Plate Tectonics

$0.00

Rated 5.00 out of 5 based on 1 customer rating
(1 customer review)

This interesting lesson introduces students to plate tectonics. Most students are fascinated when they learn the continents are always drifting, and have done so for millions of years. Understanding the concepts related to this movement is more important than memorizing the names of the plates, except students should be able to identify the seven major plates that correspond closely with the continents.

Plate Tectonics Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about Plate Tectonics.
  • Hands-on homework activities to reinforce their knowledge and understanding of Plate Tectonics.
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 4-6 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

*Note: These lessons are PDF downloads. You will be directed to the download once you checkout. Clarendon Learning resources are FREE, we rely 100% on donations to operate our site. Thank you for your support!

Description

This interesting lesson introduces students to plate tectonics. Most students are fascinated when they learn the continents are always drifting, and have done so for millions of years. Understanding the concepts related to this movement is more important than memorizing the names of the plates, except students should be able to identify the seven major plates that correspond closely with the continents.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

  1. Ask students: How does the Earth move? Do you feel its movement as you walk outdoors each day?
  2. Allow for responses and discussion. Some students may discuss the rotation or orbit of the Earth. Guide the discussion to the movement of the continents around the world.
  3. Distribute Plate Tectonics content pages. Read and review the information with the students. Use the world map to animate the continents’ movement. Use the additional resources to enhance understanding.
  4. Distribute Activity page. Read and review the instructions. The students may use the content pages for assistance. A few plates are not included. Use construction paper or plain white paper for students to mount the “puzzle”.
  5. Once all students have completed, review the work. Ask student volunteers to share their completed work.
  6. Distribute Practice page. Check and review the students’ responses.
  7. Distribute the Homework page. The next day, check and review the students’ responses. Allow students to share and discuss their predictions for the appearance of the Earth 250 million years from today.
  8. In closing, ask: What are advantages or disadvantages of the continents joined as one land mass?
  9. Allow for responses and discussion.
  10. Show one of the videos from the additional resources or other sources to close the lesson. The video should show a model of plate movement.

Common Core State Standards: 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.4.1, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.4.1.C, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.4.5, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1.C, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.5, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.7, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.10

Class Sessions (45 minutes): At least 2 class sessions

Additional Resources:

Want more science resources? Check out our other Science Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade

Subject

Science

Customer Reviews

Based on 2 reviews
5 ★
100% 
2
4 ★
0% 
0
3 ★
0% 
0
2 ★
0% 
0
1 ★
0% 
0
Write a Review
  • Reviews

Thank you for submitting a review!

Your input is very much appreciated. Share it with your friends so they can enjoy it too!

JW
01/10/2019
Joy W.
US

Plate Tectonics

The item allowed me to effectively use it in the classroom by enhancing an experiment the students completed. The graphics also allowed the students to visualize the different plate boundaries and how they affect how the Earth changes.

MM
04/05/2018
Maddy M.
US

Plate tectonics

It was very better than I expected. Thank you for allowing me to be apart of teaching the next generation plate tectonics.