Point of View

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Our interactive Point of View Lesson Plan introduces young readers to the impact that perspective has on a story – its plot, characters and author’s intent.  Strengthen reading comprehension as well as written expression as students learn how to differentiate and utilize the three major points of view in reading and writing. Students who can identify and create their own examples of the three major points of view will be able to navigate a wider range of text and to compose pieces that include more variety.

Point of View Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about the three major points of view
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on identifying and using various points of view
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 1-3 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

*Note: These lessons are PDF downloads. You will be directed to the download once you checkout. Clarendon Learning resources are FREE, we rely 100% on donations to operate our site. Thank you for your support!

Description

Our interactive Point of View Lesson Plan introduces young readers to the impact that perspective has on a story – its plot, characters and author’s intent.  Strengthen reading comprehension as well as written expression as students learn how to differentiate and utilize the three major points of view in reading and writing. Students who can identify and create their own examples of the three major points of view will be able to navigate a wider range of text and to compose pieces that include more variety.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

1. Ask two students to be volunteers and complete some simple tasks around the classroom, sharpening pencils, watering a plant, coloring a picture, etc. As the students complete the tasks, have the other students sit in the carpet
or circle area and watch as you narrate. For example, “Johnny stands up and crosses the room with a smile on his face. He is thinking this activity seems so silly. Now Robert is sitting at his desk, he’s coloring a picture.” Next, do some simple tasks yourself and narrate what you are doing, saying “I am putting this book on the shelf. I have to write myself a quick note before I can sit down and teach my lesson.” Lastly, ask a student to narrate what another student is doing, using only the word “you” to refer to the person. For example, “you are walking to the carpet. You are going back to your desk. “.

2. Explain to students that they have just heard three different points of view. Say “When someone uses words like me, my, and I, that is first person point of view. That means the speaker, or in a text, the author, is telling information from just their own point of view, the way they see things. When a speaker or author gives information and uses words like you and your, that is second person point of view. That form is not used as much as first person point of view and third person point of view. Third person is used a lot by authors who want readers to understand what multiple people are doing. They don’t want just one character to explain things, they try to show what everyone is doing and feeling. Third person point of view uses words like he, she, him, and her.”
3. Tell students they are going to listen to three short example passages and try to tell the point of view of each of the pieces.
4. After reading the three example pieces, create an anchor chart that defines each of the points of view and provides a list of “signal words” to indicate the point of view. students to the carpet/front of the room to sit together.

5. Have students work in pairs to complete the first activity page.
6. After reviewing the first activity page’s answers as a group, students will play “Narrator”. For this game, students select a card from each pile (one is phrases, one is point of view types) and will have to create a sentence using the phrase topic and point of view. For example, if a student draws “walking the dog” and “first person” they could create a sentence that says “I have to walk my dog when I get home from school.”
7. Assign the point of view homework where students will compose sentences in each point of view. After completion, check to make sure students were accurate in their responses.
8. Complete point of view quiz. Students can play Narrator one more time for a closing activity if you choose.

Common Core State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.6, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.6

Class Sessions (45 minutes): 1-3

Additional Resources:

Want more reading resources?  Check out our other Reading Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade

Subject

Reading