Reading News Stories

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Equip students to decipher the daily delivery of content with our engaging Reading News Stories Lesson Plan, which introduces the parts of traditional newspapers, explores bias, how to determine trustworthiness of news, and more.  Including the 5 W’s of writing news stories develops critical thinking and written expression as students learn how to identify the elements of a news story and use those elements to compose their own news story.  Providing ample opportunity to review news from a variety of sources with the challenge to identify bias and fake stories stimulates engagement and critical thinking skills.

Reading News Stories Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about reading news stories
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on identifying bias and the 5 W’s of writing news stories
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 4-6 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

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Description

Equip students to decipher the daily delivery of content with our engaging Reading News Stories Lesson Plan, which introduces the parts of traditional newspapers, explores bias, how to determine the trustworthiness of news and more.  Including the 5 W’s of writing news stories develops critical thinking and written expression as students learn how to identify the elements of a news story and use those elements to compose their own news story.  Providing ample opportunity to review news from a variety of sources with the challenge to identify bias and fake stories and stimulate engagement and critical thinking skills.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

Read a short news story to the class. Ask students each of the 5 W’s for the story. Who is the story about? What is it about? When did it happen? Where did it happen? Why did it happen?
2. Allow for responses and discussion. Ask students: What is the purpose of the remaining information in the story?
3. Allow for responses and discussion. Ask: Does it affect your thinking or opinion about the people, places, or things
in the story? (Other questions related to possible bias.)
4. Allow for responses and discussion. Introduce Reading News Stories.
5. Distribute Reading News Stories content pages. Read and review the information with the students. Use Internet
stories/sites (or print newspapers) to show students examples of “newspaper” parts and the elements of news stories. Save the final question for the lesson closing. Use the additional resources to enhance understanding.
6. Distribute Activity page. Read and review the instructions. Distribute the same four news stories to each pair of
students. (At least 2 should be biased, one fake, and one neutral if possible.) Allow students time to discuss the stories with their partners and to complete the activity.
7. Circulate through the room to ensure students remain on task. Once completed, facilitate a class discussion related
to the stories and students’ responses to activity questions.
8. Distribute Practice page. Check and review the students’ responses.
9. Distribute the Homework page. Review the instructions. The next day, allow students to share their responses and
news story
10. In closing, ask: What news story in the past year do you remember the most and why?

Common Core State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.3, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.7, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.3, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.7, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.6.3, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.6.7

Class Sessions (45 minutes): At least 2 class sessions.

Additional Resources:

Want more reading resources?  Check out our other Reading Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade

Subject

Reading