Similes

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The lesson introduces young students to similes, which most students have used but are not aware there is a term to describe them.  The students are encouraged to use their imaginations when creating and writing similes. Many of those used in the English language have become clichés, which have prevented many original similes to be used when describing or comparing people, places, or things.  The use of pictures and student drawings is also encouraged.

Similes Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about Similes
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on Similes
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 1-3 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

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Description

The lesson introduces young students to similes, which most students have used but are not aware there is a term to describe them.  The lesson reminds students the words like and as are indicators they are reading a simile.  The students are encouraged to use their imaginations when creating and writing similes. Many of those used in the English language have become clichés, which has prevented many original similes from being used when describing or comparing people, places, or things.  The use of pictures and student drawings is also encouraged so they understand the concept presented in the lesson.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction: 

  1. Ask questions, such as: How hungry are you?  How big is the Earth?  How dark is it at night?  (Or others.)  Tell students to share an answer by comparing it to something else.
  2. Allow for responses and discussion. Lead the conversation to similes.
  3. Distribute Similes content pages. Read and review the information with the students.  Use the additional resources to enhance understanding.
  4. Distribute Activity page. Read and review the instructions.  Distribute colored pencils.  (Students may also use images from magazines, books, the Internet, or other resources.)  Allow students time to complete.  Circulate through the room to check for understanding.
  5. When students have finished, they will share one or more of their images with the class explaining the meaning of the image and the simile. Collect the images for each simile and create a separate collage for each, using the students’ drawings or images.
  6. Distribute Practice page. Check and review the students’ responses.  Students share the sentences they created using the similes.
  7. Distribute the Homework page. Review the instructions.  Encourage students to work with a parent or another family member.  On the back of the homework page, tell students to list some similes a parent or family member may know.  The next day, check and review the students’ responses.
  8. In closing, ask:  Can you think of two similes comparing yourself or something about you to another thing?  Distribute scratch paper and give students time to write two similes about themselves.  One using as and another using like.
  9. Allow volunteers to share one or both similes with the class.

Common Core State Standards: 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.1.5, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.2.5, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.5, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.4

Class Sessions (45 minutes): At least 2 class sessions.

Additional Resources: 

Want more language arts resources? Check out our other Language Arts Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade

Subject

Language Arts