Writing a Book Report

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Combine multiple skills needed for effective written communication and provide reading and comprehension practice for young students with our Writing a Book Report Lesson Plan. Writing a book reports allows students to summarize, state opinions, and identify key information in written format from what they’ve read. Studies show that when reading and writing are tied together, it increases student comprehension and reinforces the connection between reading and written communication. A book report is a simple format that will ease students into writing more in depth styles of reports later in their education.

Writing a Book Report Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about writing a book report
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on drafting and revising a book report
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 1-3 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

*Note: These lessons are PDF downloads. You will be directed to the download once you checkout. Clarendon Learning resources are FREE, we rely 100% on donations to operate our site. Thank you for your support!

Description

Combine multiple skills needed for effective written communication and provide reading and comprehension practice for young students with our Writing a Book Report Lesson Plan. Writing a book reports allows students to summarize, state opinions, and identify key information in written format from what they’ve read. Studies show that when reading and writing are tied together, it increases student comprehension and reinforces the connection between reading and written communication. A book report is a simple format that will ease students into writing more in depth styles of reports later in their education.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction

1. Sit in the front of the room or gathering area with one of your personal favorite children’s picture books or novels. Ask the class to join you and hold up the text. Say, “Who has a favorite book?” Call on volunteers to tell you the titles of the books. Then say, “This book is my favorite book. Let me tell you what happens in this book.” Tell the students a brief summary of the book (almost like an oral book report) and then proceed to tell the students why you like the book. Ask students who shared a favorite book if they can give a summary and a few reasons why they like the book. Explain that what students have just done is give a book report. Explain, “A book report is an after reading activity where the reader reports what happens in the book, and then shares their opinion about the book so that other readers will want to enjoy the book as well. Today, we are going to start working on creating book reports. We will look at the structure, things that need to be included, and good tips for writing a report.”
2. Say, “Let’s listen to a story together now and then read a book report about the story. This story is called
Brave Irene by William Steig.” Use your computer or smartboard to go to this link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoOFL_Gz_C4 to hear the story read aloud. If you do not have that technology available and cannot borrow the text from the library, here is the story in full text : https://www.scribd.com/doc/16636067/Brave-Irene (free to join and print out, or can be read through on screen).
3. After hearing the story, read the book report (attached) and ask students to note what they hear the author include, such as retelling the plot, author and illustrator names, summarizing, including important events, explaining why they recommend the book, etc. As they give answers, write them on the board to use in creation of the anchor chart.
4. Create an anchor chart that is organized as below. Give the students the tip, “Remember, ‘give me five’!” They can use their hand with the five fingers to help them recall what to include. You can structure the chart as a drawing of a hand with the five items on five fingers if you think the visual will be helpful to your students. Give Me Five- Five Must-Haves for a Great Book Report!
1. What’s the title?
2. Who is the author? Is there an illustrator?
3. What’s the story mainly about?
4. What is your favorite part?
5. What did you like about this book?
5. Have students select a partner and a text from the classroom library that they can read independently. If you do not have a classroom library, feel free to use the resources for free online e-books included in the additional resources page. Have partners complete a book report form on Activity Page One together. Conference with each pair at completion. Have them read you their report with their text at hand so you can check for accuracy and if key information is included.
6. Have students work independently on the activity page two and practice page.
7. Assign the task of independently creating a book report for homework. As a closing activity, have students present their reports to the class or to small groups within the class.

Common Core State Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.10, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.10, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.4, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.4.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.1

Class Sessions (45 minutes): 3

Additional Resources:

Want more reading resources?  Check out our other Reading Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade

Subject

Reading

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KK
04/03/2019
Kenzie K.
US

Excellent Resource

It is a very useful supplement to my son's writing.