Writing Tone and Style

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The lesson introduces students to the tone and style of writing.  Students who are regular readers can usually tell the difference between their favorite author’s tone and style versus another author.  They can identify the differences more easily than students who are not regular readers.  However, this lesson will help all students recognize clues to help them identify the tone and style, as well as the mood, of the stories or text they read.  Students may also discover their style and tone with their writing.  The lesson may be used in conjunction with other reading or writing lessons, such as metaphor, similes, etc.

Writing Tone and Style Lesson Plan Includes:

  • Full Teacher Guidelines with Creative Teaching Ideas
  • Instructional Content Pages about Writing Tone and Style
  • Hands-on homework activities giving students practice on finding their own Writing Tone and Style
  • Answer Keys
  • Common Core State Standards
  • Many Additional Links and Resources
  • Built for Grades 5-6 but can be adapted for other grade levels.

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Description

The lesson introduces students to tone and style in writing.  As students move through the lesson, they will be able recognize clues to help them identify the tone and style, as well as the mood, of the stories or text they read.  What your students may not realize even as they consider tone of other text is that their own writing has a tone and style as well, and these are skills they can work to improve or change as they write.  Learning to determine the tone and style of other writing will help students develop their own voice.  The lesson can be used in conjunction with other reading or writing lessons, such as metaphor, similes, etc.

Sample Classroom Procedure / Teacher Instruction: 

  1. For the first 2 or 3 minutes, speak to the class in different tones of voice (happy, angry, sad), the statements could be random or about events at the school. Try to use short and long sentences, use similes/metaphors, abstract/concrete language, etc.
  2. After a few minutes, ask students: (In your “teacher voice”, what did you notice about how I was speaking to you the first few minutes of class?
  3. Allow for responses and discussion. Ask students to recall and share specific examples of the words you used and how the tone of voice changed, what it was like for them.
  4. Allow for responses and discussion. Ask:  Do you think writers do the same thing?
  5. Allow for responses. Introduce Tone and Style.
  6. Distribute Writing Tone and Style content pages. Read and review the information with the students.  Throughout the discussion of the content, use current reading content or other specific examples to demonstrate the use of style and tone in writing.  Save the final question for the lesson closing.  Use the additional resources to enhance understanding.
  7. Distribute Activity page. Read and review the instructions.  Pair students.  Remind students to add details throughout the passage to incorporate the required tone and style elements.  (It is okay if the poem no longer rhymes.)
  8. Once completed, students share their new passages, identifying the required tone and style elements.
  9. Distribute Practice page. Check and review the students’ responses.
  10. Distribute the Homework page. The next day, check and review the students’ responses.  Students share info about their day.

Common Core State Standards: 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.7, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.6.4, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.6.3.B

Class Sessions (45 minutes): At least 2 class sessions

Additional Resources:

Many more teaching resources in Download!

Want more reading resources?  Check out our other Reading Lesson Plans!

Additional information

Grade Level

5th Grade, 6th Grade

Subject

Reading